Systems Thinking for Leaders

Posted on Jul 17 in Deming, Experiemntal Design/Evolutionary Ops, Hoshin/Policy Deployment, Lean Six Sigma, OpX Thinking, Performance Measurement and Metrics, Quality Function Deployment, Training Workshops by

 

Problems cannot be solved with the same level of thinking that created them.

–Alberta Einstein

 

Almost all Lean, Lean Six Sigma, and related improvement initiatives fail because of a focus on tools and techniques without an understanding of thinking and theory behind them. That thinking is Systems Thinking. Read More

Ohno’s Seven Wastes (Muda)

Posted on Jul 17 in Lean by

 

The starting concept of the Toyota productions system was, as I have emphasized several times, a thorough elimination of waste. 

( Taiichi Ohno, Toyota Production System: Beyond Large Scale Production in Preface to the English Edition p.xiv)

The Toyota production system is a method to thoroughly eliminate waste and enhance productivity. In production, ‘waste’ refers to all elements of production that only increase cost without adding value .

(Taiichi Ohno, Toyota Production System: Beyond Large Scale Production p.54)
 

The Waste of Overproduction.

Overproduction is producing more of something than is required. Producing more than is required means producing too much, or producing too soon or both. This results in poor flow with goods being pushed out rather than being pulled in.

The Waste of Unnecessary Motion.

Unnecessary motions refer to the importance of ergonomics for quality and productivity. If operators have to stretch, bend, pick-up, move in order to see better, or in any way unduly exert themselves, the victim is immediately the operator but ultimately quality and productivity.

The Waste of Unnecessary Inventory.

Parts, raw materials, work-in-process, inventory, supplies, and finished goods are all forms of inventory. Inventory is considered muda since it does not add value to the product.

Inappropriate Processing.

Processing muda consists of additional steps or activities in the manufacturing process. Conducting the work using inappropriate tools, methods, procedures or systems typically result in a waste of time or the production of defects. This is often a function of increasing complexity requiring a simplification of the process or a reduction in the variety of tools.

Excessive Transportation.

All forms of transportation are muda. This includes the use of forklifts, conveyors, pallet movers, and trucks. Excessive movement of information, materials, goods, products or people results in wasted time and effort and increases costs.

Waiting.

The muda of waiting occurs when an operator is ready for the next operation, but must remain idle. Periods of inactivity for information, goods or people resulting in poor flow and long lead times.

The Waste of Defects.

The last, but not least, of Ohno’s wastes is the waste of defects. Any error or variation from a standard in the production of a product, in the delivery of service or in the processing of paperwork or information is a defect. Costs associated with defects include the costs of detection or testing, reprocessing costs or cost of scrapping should reprocessing prove impossible as well as warranty costs and the costs associated with dissatisfied customers.

Lean Six Sigma for Leaders/Executives

Posted on Jul 17 in Lean Six Sigma, Training Workshops by

Lean Six Sigma for Leaders is designed to provide organizational leadership with an understanding of the theory and thinking behind Lean Six Sigma as well as provide an overview of the LSS improvement model/framework and some of the basic tools and techniques used. This is offered as a one day briefing or a two day workshop. Read More

Lean Methods Accelerator

Posted on Jul 17 in Lean, Training Workshops by

This course provides a comprehensive overview of Lean Enterprise tools and methods, which may be used to supplement a Six Sigma curriculum.

Lean topics include value stream mapping, continuous flow, takt time, kaizen, line balancing, quick changeover, pull systems, and 5-S, among others. Read More

Lean Six Sigma Champion Training

Posted on Jul 17 in Lean Six Sigma, Training Workshops by

The Champion course provides you with an overview of the Define-Measure-Analyze-Improve-Control (DMAIC) process.

You will learn a group of basic problem-solving tools used for project selection and management and receive guidance on leading teams and leading change. Read More

Lean Six Sigma Black Belt Certification Training

Posted on Jul 17 in Lean Six Sigma, Training Workshops by

Lean Six Sigma training using the D-M-A-I-C methodology with integrated Lean tools and techniques. This course covers the complete Lean Six Sigma Black Belt Body of Knowledge.

Lean enterprise topics include value stream mapping, continuous flow, line balancing, quick changeover, and others. Numerous case studies and examples focus on Service, Business Process, and Manufacturing applications. Green Belt is NOT a prerequisite. Read More

Lean Six Sigma Green Belt Certification Training

Posted on Jul 17 in Lean Six Sigma, Training Workshops by

Lean Six Sigma training using the D-M-A-I-C methodology with integrated Lean tools and techniques. This course covers the complete Lean Six Sigma Green Belt Body of Knowledge.

Lean enterprise topics include value stream mapping, continuous flow, line balancing, quick changeover, and others. Numerous case studies and examples focus on Service, Business Process, and Manufacturing applications. Read More

Lean Six Sigma Yellow Belt Certification Training

Posted on Jul 17 in Lean Six Sigma by

This course is designed to provide a broad understanding of the Lean Six Sigma improvement methodology, concepts, and language, along with a toolbox of basic process improvement methods applied within the Lean Six Sigma DMAIC framework, including basic Statistical Process Control Charts. Read More

economisting

Posted on Jul 17 in OpX Thinking, Performance Measurement and Metrics by

Economisting: (e kon’ o mist’ ing) 1. The act or process of converting limited evidence into grand claims by means of rhetorical ploys, especially punning. 2. The belief or practice that empirical evidence can only confirm and never disconfirm a favored theory. 3. Conclusions that are theory-driven, not evidence based. See also confirmation bias, painting with a broad brush, Iraqi weapons of mass destruction, post-modern critical theory, marketing.

Edward Tufte provides us with a new word to describe an old idea–using and presenting data in a manner designed to mislead the consumer of research.  In consulting, including areas of employee and customer engagement engagement research, this is reflected in:

  • using statistical significance as a measure of practical importance (material significance),
  • making grand claims that go beyond the evidence, such as (i) performance measures using a single statistic (such as the average),  (ii) using cherry-picked samples and data, (iii) statistical models claiming to predict performance, (iv) using rankings,
  • using data to support decision-based evidence-making rather than evidenced-based decision-making.

We concur with Dr. Tufte that data analysis & presentation is an intellectual and a moral act. At Converge we endeavor to keep our work, in all areas of practice, economisting free.  Providing consumers of research, information without window dressing or spin.